The Relobie Survey (2016)

The RELOBIE project integrated data from several sources to portray a comprehensive picture of the expectations and experiences of students and instructors (171 faculty members and 530 students in four partner countries) in the participating institutions regarding the educational application of videos and other digital technologies. Partners utilized findings from the study to empower educators with better tools, skills and know-how on video production and use in particular, and technology-supported learning more generally. The report was published in 2016.

Faculty Survey

Findings from the current study concur with those of previously conducted studies, which suggest that most higher education faculty tend to have positive attitudes toward the instructional use of videos and other contemporary technologies, seeing them as a critical aspect of the modern HE learning environment.

They consider technology to be a valuable tool that can greatly enhance the instructional process in both traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms and virtual learning environments.  At the same time, however, it became obvious in this study that many instructors tend to lack appreciation of the true potential of technology for transforming the nature of higher education, viewing technology as mainly a useful aid for delivering course content and/or for increasing student motivation, rather than as a tool for transforming teaching and learning.

Most of the respondents, restricted their use of technology to mainly representation tools such as PowerPoint, and made minimal use of interactive technologies (social media, simulations, games, educational software, and media manipulation software, etc.) that can promote student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based learning environments.

Faculty in our study reported not only opportunities, but also a number of challenges in their strive to keep pace with the pervasive spread of new and innovative classroom technologies. The main barriers identified are the high investment in time and effort required to keep up with technology advancements, and the need for continuous training on the educational applications of new technologies.

Nonetheless, participants were generally committed to using technology in more innovative ways, and were thus open to institutional-provided opportunities for professional development focused on contemporary technologies and their effective integration into instructional design and delivery. At the same time, while factors such as institutional resources, institutional support, and peer support appeared important in motivating instructors’ technology integration process, the most essential reason behind their willingness to incorporate any new technological tool into their teaching practices were its perceived benefits on student learning.

Faculty Survey for teaching staff:
relobie_faculty-survey_results

Student Survey

Findings from the current study concur with those of previously conducted studies, which suggest that most higher education students (and their instructors) tend to have very positive attitudes toward the instructional use of videos and other contemporary technologies, seeing them as a critical aspect of the modern HE learning environment. Students in our study stressed the importance and value of videos and other technological tools in enhancing the learning process in both traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms and virtual learning environments. With regards to videos, in particular, students pointed out that their inclusion in the classroom is important because videos can be watched over and over again and can be easily re-winded, paused, and reviewed as many times as required. Respondents also highlighted the fact that videos can serve as motivational tools and as tools for introducing new concepts or better illustrating or clarifying concepts introduced in class.

At the same time, it became obvious in this study that HE students tend to attend courses where instructors lack appreciation of the true potential of technology for transforming the nature of higher education, viewing technology as mainly a useful aid for delivering course content and/or for increasing student motivation, rather than as a tool for transforming teaching and learning.

Most of the respondents, indicated that their instructors restricted their use of technology to mainly representation tools such as PowerPoint, and made minimal use of interactive technologies (social media, simulations, games, educational software, and media manipulation software, etc.) that can promote student-centered, collaborative, and inquiry-based learning environments.

Students in our study reported not only opportunities, but also a number of barriers to the educational use of videos. Handling of technical issues by faculty and technical staff at their institutions was the main issue/challenge experienced by students. A considerable proportion argued either that their instructors did not seem to have adequate technology skills to handle technical issues regarding video use, and/or that there was lack of readily available administrative/technical support at their institution for the integration of videos or other educational tools into teaching and learning.

Survey for students:
relobie_student-survey_results

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